Industry Buzz

Reading Roundup: September 3rd, 2019

This week in food industry news: The new hotbed for food startups, a look into the curious business model of Trader Joe's, and Popeyes' big win.

Reading Roundup: September 3rd, 2019

This week, we're expecting the unexpected from our news stories. A New York Times feature of several food brands reveals that the college campus is the new hotbed of food startups. And a look into Trader Joe's business model shows us that counterintuitive business logic can actually be the most successful of all. Finally, a look into the buzziest story of the week - the Popeye's Chicken Sandwich - and what it actually meant for the fast food company. Who knew one sandwich could rule the zeitgeist?

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Here's a rundown:

Ponder: Dorm to Table: College Start-Ups Take Aim at Food Industry (New York Times)

Gone are the days when college entrepreneurs were only creating apps and software. Now, the hottest startups to come out of college campuses are food brands. Founders are getting younger and more innovative, and their proximity to snack-hungry millennials is allowing them to test and create successful products. You wouldn't guess that the brands mentioned here originated in a dorm room!

Learn: Should America Be Run by… Trader Joe’s? (Medium)

Don't be swayed by the headline! This story is a fascinating investigation into the business model of Trader Joe's, a unique business among grocery chains. You'll learn about real estate, labor, consumer science and the paradox of choice. It ties in with an episode of the Freakonomics podcast, so if you're a nerd for retail and business strategy, this is a story not to miss.

Read: Popeyes Chicken Sandwich, Now A Sell-Out, Is A $65 Million Marketing Win (Forbes)

The friend chicken sandwich absolutely dominated public discourse this week. Now, with the Popeyes creation sold out after its limited run in restaurants, we can examine what it meant. The fast food company took hold of the zeitgeist, and new reports are showing that $65 million in media value was created from the launch. Seems like we can all take a page out of Popeye's book when it comes to PR.

Get our weekly Reading Roundup right in your inbox with our newsletter!

This week, we're expecting the unexpected from our news stories. A New York Times feature of several food brands reveals that the college campus is the new hotbed of food startups. And a look into Trader Joe's business model shows us that counterintuitive business logic can actually be the most successful of all. Finally, a look into the buzziest story of the week - the Popeye's Chicken Sandwich - and what it actually meant for the fast food company. Who knew one sandwich could rule the zeitgeist?

Want to share some news? You can always let us know.

Our newsletter subscribers get our Reading Roundup delivered right to their inbox. Join them!

Here's a rundown:

Ponder: Dorm to Table: College Start-Ups Take Aim at Food Industry (New York Times)

Gone are the days when college entrepreneurs were only creating apps and software. Now, the hottest startups to come out of college campuses are food brands. Founders are getting younger and more innovative, and their proximity to snack-hungry millennials is allowing them to test and create successful products. You wouldn't guess that the brands mentioned here originated in a dorm room!

Learn: Should America Be Run by… Trader Joe’s? (Medium)

Don't be swayed by the headline! This story is a fascinating investigation into the business model of Trader Joe's, a unique business among grocery chains. You'll learn about real estate, labor, consumer science and the paradox of choice. It ties in with an episode of the Freakonomics podcast, so if you're a nerd for retail and business strategy, this is a story not to miss.

Read: Popeyes Chicken Sandwich, Now A Sell-Out, Is A $65 Million Marketing Win (Forbes)

The friend chicken sandwich absolutely dominated public discourse this week. Now, with the Popeyes creation sold out after its limited run in restaurants, we can examine what it meant. The fast food company took hold of the zeitgeist, and new reports are showing that $65 million in media value was created from the launch. Seems like we can all take a page out of Popeye's book when it comes to PR.

Get our weekly Reading Roundup right in your inbox with our newsletter!

This week, we're expecting the unexpected from our news stories. A New York Times feature of several food brands reveals that the college campus is the new hotbed of food startups. And a look into Trader Joe's business model shows us that counterintuitive business logic can actually be the most successful of all. Finally, a look into the buzziest story of the week - the Popeye's Chicken Sandwich - and what it actually meant for the fast food company. Who knew one sandwich could rule the zeitgeist?

Want to share some news? You can always let us know.

Our newsletter subscribers get our Reading Roundup delivered right to their inbox. Join them!

Here's a rundown:

Ponder: Dorm to Table: College Start-Ups Take Aim at Food Industry (New York Times)

Gone are the days when college entrepreneurs were only creating apps and software. Now, the hottest startups to come out of college campuses are food brands. Founders are getting younger and more innovative, and their proximity to snack-hungry millennials is allowing them to test and create successful products. You wouldn't guess that the brands mentioned here originated in a dorm room!

Learn: Should America Be Run by… Trader Joe’s? (Medium)

Don't be swayed by the headline! This story is a fascinating investigation into the business model of Trader Joe's, a unique business among grocery chains. You'll learn about real estate, labor, consumer science and the paradox of choice. It ties in with an episode of the Freakonomics podcast, so if you're a nerd for retail and business strategy, this is a story not to miss.

Read: Popeyes Chicken Sandwich, Now A Sell-Out, Is A $65 Million Marketing Win (Forbes)

The friend chicken sandwich absolutely dominated public discourse this week. Now, with the Popeyes creation sold out after its limited run in restaurants, we can examine what it meant. The fast food company took hold of the zeitgeist, and new reports are showing that $65 million in media value was created from the launch. Seems like we can all take a page out of Popeye's book when it comes to PR.

Get our weekly Reading Roundup right in your inbox with our newsletter!

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